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Our “9mm vs. 45” Survival debate was a popular one, so we’re going to take it one step further and go to the ultimate U. S.

Survival Debate: .308 Win vs. .223 Rem

Survival Debate: .308 Win vs. .223 RemOur “9mm vs. 45” Survival debate was a popular one, so we’re going to take it one step further and go to the ultimate U.S. Military assault rifle comparison: the great .223 Remington, (NATO designation 5.56x45mm) vs. the stalwart .308 Winchester (NATO designation 7.62x51mm).  They are both battle proven platforms that have been in service since the 1950’s and remain in service today with both the United States Military and our NATO allies .  They are also both one of the most common types of rifle rounds manufactured in the United States, which is why they are the preferred choice of survivalists. Before we get started, if you want to design a BOB with the proper guns, and gear, check out this guide from our team member and former-CIA officer: #1 Book #1 Book The FireArms Survival Guide Definitive Guide on How to Protect Your Gun Rights and Gain Your Ammo Independence! How to Custom Build Your Very Own AR-15 Survival Rifle Learn how to hide your guns and ammo, and much more... Get Your Copy Now #1 Book #1 Book The Bug Out Bag Guns Book Guns (and Other Gear) You Need to Survive in a Hostile Environment Written by former CIA officer Insider look at packing the ultimate bug out bag "Get Your Copy" Now Quick Navigation The .308 Winchester .308 Pros: .308 Cons: The .223 Remington .223 Pros .223 Cons Apples to Apples Ballistics (standard US military loadings) Pick Your Poison The .308 Winchester The .308 Winchester was brought out as a sporting cartridge in 1952, and was made by shortening a .30-06 Springfield (7.62x63mm) case to fit a standard short-action rifle.  The .308 proved to be a very efficient caliber, motivating its projectiles to within 150 feet per second of its higher case capacity parent, with incredible inherent accuracy. It soon became the most popular short-action big game caliber in the world, a title it still holds. Bullet weights are occasionally encountered as light as 55 grains in Remington’s old “Accelerator” loadings, but are usually from 125 grains to 220 grains, with 150, 165/168, and 180 grain loadings the most commonly encountered commercial bullet weights.  The U.S. Military adopted the cartridge two years later for its M14 rifle , and it still soldiers on in light machine gun and intermediate-range sniper duty.  It was superseded in standard infantry rifle capacity in U.S. Military service by the .223/5.56-chambered M16 rifle . .308 Pros: 1. Inherently a brilliantly accurate cartridge, even out to 1,000 yards 2. Very versatile, with a wide range of bullet weights an profiles to accomplish everything from varmint hunting to big game hunting to sniping. 3. Heavier bullets retain velocity and energy better at longer ranges, especially with modern VLD (Very Low Drag) projectiles. Reach out and touch someone with NO problems. 4. Larger diameter bullet (.308”) coupled with heavier weight means more surface area for knock-down power, and deeper penetration in targets. 5. Still a standard U.S. Military caliber, with ammunition relatively easy to come by in bulk. 6. The .308 is a reloader’s dream, being very accommodating of a wide range of projectiles and powders, with usually excellent accuracy. .308 Cons: 1. .308-chambered rifles are larger and heavier than their equivalent .223 brethren. 2. Magazines for .308 battle rifles are generally harder to come by. 3. Magazines are generally only 20-round capacity at their largest, and even at 20 rounds, are much heavier loaded than even a loaded 30-round AR-15 magazine. 4. Personal magazine and round loadout generally is lower, due to added bulk and weight of .308 cartridge. 5. The larger bulk of the .308 cartridge means it is more expensive to buy and takes up more storage space on the ammo rack. 6. .308 sporting rifles are very easily obtained, but .308 battle rifles (M14/SOCOM, HK 91, FN FAL/CETME, etc.) are more difficult to find and expensive to buy than their .223 brethren. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA The .223 Remington The .223 was developed more or less concurrently with the M16 rifle in 1963, as an offshoot of the .222/.222 Remington Magnum line of small-bore cartridges. The U.S. military wanted a caliber that would have a higher round loadout and high lethality, with reduced recoil and higher rate of fire.  Analysts showed that the standard infantryman could carry roughly twice the amount of ammunition per man versus the 7.62×51/M14 package, and therefore would theoretically bring more firepower with a faster-handling rifle. This was also thought to hold true when compared to the NVA’s AK-47/7.62x39mm combination. After some teething issues, the M16 and its new cartridge ended up proving to be a useful package, and it has proven itself well enough to still be the standard U.S. infantryman’s rifle to this day, 52 years later. The caliber has become very popular in the civilian market, with varmint and small game hunters taking a liking to its low recoil and blast, flat trajectory and speedy lightweight bullet, and readily available surplus brass supply for reloading.  Preppers, survivalists, police forces, and the everyday gun enthusiast have flocked en masse to the AR-15, the civilian version of the military M16, for the same reasons the military adopted the caliber. .223 Pros 1. Very good to excellent accuracy, as well as low recoil and low report. 2. Excellent performance on small game, varmints, and even animals up to the size of a deer with proper bullet selection and careful bullet placement. 3. Wide range of loadings available, from 36 grain varmint loads that fragment quickly in unwanted critters, to 90 grain VLD bullets that retain flat trajectories at intermediate (out to 500 yards or so) ranges. 4. Sheer popularity of the AR-15 platform means that ammunition, magazines, spare parts, and upgrades will be easily obtainable for the foreseeable future. Vast numbers improve odds of pick-up or salvage guns for parts or use. 5. Light weight and small size of .223 cartridge means that more rounds can be carried in a given area or on a person than the .308, which is much heavier. 6. .223 ammuntion is of small size and takes up less storage space in bulk 7. .223 is reasonably lethal to 300 yards or so for the average shooter. 8. Light weight of rifles and low recoil means less training time to master, andeasier use in field 9. Can be converted to .22 Long Rifle in a pinch for training or small-game hunting 10. Easy to reload with good to very good accuracy resulting. .223 Cons 1. Relatively low bullet mass and diameter (.224”) means less frontal area for knockdown power and less penetration, especially on hardened targets 2. Bullets theoretically prone to “tumbling” (spinning end over end), which may be a good or bad thing depending on terminal ballistic viewpoint. “Tumbling” bullets theoretically do more terminal damage, but penetrate much less farther. 3. Lower energy and lower penetration of lighter bullets means that the cartridge is out of big-game hunting territory. 4. Even with heavier, longer bullets, the .223 loses its velocity much more quickly than the .308, limiting its practical effectiveness to 500 yards with 69+ grain bullets, and probably 300-400 yards with 69 grain and lower bullets. 5. The lightweight bullet of the .223 is very susceptible to wind drift, even at short distances. 6. The .223 seems to be more bullet weight and rifling-twist sensitive than the .308, with the same bullet and load accuracy varying greatly even between 1:7 and 1:9 twist rifles. Apples to Apples To compare size differences between .308 and .223 rifles, let’s compare one excellent company’s lineup of equivalent rifles, one in .308 and the other in .223. Windham Weaponry offers a “SRC” (Sight Ready Carbine) variant in both caliber lineups. The carbine in both instances offers a railed gas block and collapsible stock, with flat-top upper receivers. No optics or accessories are added. Also Read: SOCOM 16 Battle Rifle Review .308 Win. SRC: ( link to full specs here ) Overall Length: 38” with stock extended, 34.1875” with stock collapsed Weight: 7.55 lbs. with empty 20-round magazine Barrel length: 16.5” MSRP: $1,413.00 .223 SRC: ( link to full specs here ) Overall Length: 36.125” with stock extended, 32.375” stock collapsed Weight: 6.3 lbs with empty 30-round magazine Barrel length: 16” MSRP: $1,040.00 Keep in mind that M14 based platforms, HK91s, and FN-FAL based platforms are all substantially heavier than their AR10 counterparts. Individual Loadout Comparison (data from 7.62x51mm NATO Wikipedia ) RIFLE     CALIBER       WT. OF LOADED MAG          22lb. AMMO LOAD M14           .308 Win          1 lb 7 oz. / 20 rounds          14 mags – 280 rounds M16           .223 Rem         0 lb 10.5 oz / 20 rounds      33 mags – 660 rounds Ballistics (standard US military loadings) .223/5.56x45mm M855 – 62 grain Full Metal Jacket (FMJ), 20” barrel 3,025 feet per second (FPS) velocity at the muzzle 1,260 foot-pounds of energy (FPE) at the muzzle .308/7.62x51mm M80 – 147 grain FMJ, 22” barrel 2750 feet per second (FPS) velocity at the muzzle 2462 foot-pounds of energy (FPE) at the muzzle Cost Per Round as of 1/4/2015: (costs taken from Brownells.com ) M80 7.62×51:  500 rounds for $345.00, $0.69/round M855 5.56×45: 600 rounds for $340.00, $0.57/round Of course, prices vary based on quantity and manufacturer, these prices were taken as examples. You can check out the websites below for better pricing: Brownells.com - Best Place To Buy Ammo #1 Site with Best Deals Large selection of ammo, firearms, etc. Free shipping Check Latest Pricing 1800GunsAndAmmo.com #1 Local Store Large selection Located in Texas. Shipping anywhere in U.S. "Check Latest Pricing" "Pick Your Poison" The Balloon goes up, you have to bug out the door. You have a .223 battle rifle and a 7.62 battle rifle, each with a full standard 22 lb. loadout. What do you grab (only one, please!) and what is your reasoning? Sound off in the comments below! Photos By: Mr. Smashy Survival Cache Team Military Archives Save Save Save Other interesting articles: Survival Debate: 9mm or .45 PDW – Do You Really Need One? 2020 Debate Survival Debate: .223 Rem VS .300 AAC-Blackout S&W 15-22 vs Ruger 10/22: Survival Rifle Debate for 2020

10 Best Gun Oils 2020

10 Best Gun Oils 2020

Is your firearm starting to wear down? Are you looking for a solution? If so, get ready to find an answer! A firearm usually isn’t used quite often, unless you’re in the military or you own a firing range. With this being said, any machine that forces rough and harsh contact of metal parts against one another needs to be lubricated from time to time, regardless of how frequently it’s used. A firearm is no exception to this statement. Large or small, you’ll need to make sure your gun is optimally greased. You’ll need a great lubricant, such as gun oil , for this pursuit. Finding the best gun oil, however, can be a challenge, but thanks to our easy-to-use guide, you can easily compare and contrast the top products side by side in order to find the right one for your needs and budget. Consider This Here’s a look at a few things to take into account when you’re looking to buy! Boundary or Hydrodynamic. When it comes to lubricants for metal or hard-surface machinery, there are predominantly two types: boundary and hydrodynamic. Hydrodynamic is a little prehistoric, and simply fills the cracks of the rough edges that are wearing against a surface. Boundary, on the other hand, fills these same cracks with microscopic solids that permanently provide a layer of resistant and lubrication for the surfaces that are rubbing against one another. Water Resistant? Some oils aren’t waterproof. This can impair the ability of your firearm to function properly in humid or wet climates if that’s the area you’ll be operating it in. Lubrication Location. Some oils will cover all parts of your firearm that need lubrication. Some will only cover a specific location. Keep in mind which area the oil you’re thinking about purchasing is able to target! Not all oils are designed the same! Top 10 Gun Oils Ultimate Table Picture Name Low Temp. Use? Price Rating (1-5) Picture Name Low Temp. Use? Price Rating (1-5) 1. Slip2000 60320 EWL Extreme Weapons Lubricant Twist Top, 4-Ounce Yes $$$ 4.9 2. Hoppe's No. 9 Lubricating Oil, 14.9 ml Precision Bottle Yes $ 4.8 3. Break-Free CLP-4 Cleaner Lubricant Preservative Squeeze Bottle Yes $$ 4.8 4. Kano Kroil Penetrating Oil, 8 oz. liquid (KROIL) No $$$ 4.8 5. M-Pro 7 Gun Oil LPX, Null No $ 4.8 6. Hoppe's No. 9 Synthetic Blend Lubricating Oil, 2.25-Ounce Yes $$ 4.8 7. Slip2000 EWL30 Twist Top, 4-Ounce Yes $$$ 4.8 8. F W Klever GmbH Ballistol Multi-Purpose Aerosol Can Lubricant Cleaner Protectant Yes $ 4.7 9. Break-Free CLP-2 "Cleaner Lubricant Preservative" 4 oz Yes $$ 4.7 10. Break-Free CLP-5 Cleaner Lubricant Preservative with Trigger Sprayer Yes $$$$ 4.6 Buying Information Before we get to our picks for the best gun oil , let’s discuss a few more things that may be relevant when you’re looking to lubricate your firearm. Thicker Isn’t Better. Many oils are often touted as “Super Products”. Often times, these oils simply don’t live up to the hype. One of the things they often boast is thicker oil, which actually isn’t great for your firearm. Thinner oil is much more effective. Environmental Performance. Nobody buys a firearm to shoot it in one temperature range or climate type! The best gun oil is oil that stays strong and functions well in really low or really high temperatures. Sweat Resistant. This important, especially if you shoot for long periods of time! Everyone’s hands will eventually perspire. Top 3 Best Gun Oil Reviews 1. Slip2000 "Extreme Weapons Lubricant" Twist Top Although it’s on the pricey end of the spectrum, this oil will be worth every penny. Let’s take a look at why it’s so great. You’ll be able to use this versatile lubricant on all of your toys. From guns to band saws, this oil does the trick! Pertaining to firearms, you’ll surely get smooth operation from any area you apply it to. Whether it’s your trigger or your hammer, you’re going to want to incorporate this oil into your firearm’s maintenance. Another great feature of this product is its safety. The developers of this oil kept the environment in mind. It’s non-toxic, and safe to throw away. Lastly, it’s also temperature resistant. Shoot in the cold and watch your gun perform amazingly. The Slip2000 60320 EWL Extreme Weapons Lubricant Twist Top is a great product to buy if you want to maintain your firearm in the best possible way. 2. Hoppe’s No. 9 Lubricating Oil Both highly viscous and highly coveted, this oil is a potent force when it comes to firearm maintenance. Let’s get into what makes this oil a great product to use on your firearm. Firstly, it’s quite viscous. Don’t be mistaken, however; this doesn’t mean it’s thicker! It simply means it doesn’t flow very smoothly. It’ll stay in all of the places you want it to. It’s both synthetic and boundary oil. This oil will slip through all the cracks of worn and degraded surfaces and lubricate them at a fantastic rate! Save your tools and firearms for years of use! You won’t have to use much, wherever you apply it. This stuff is strong! Add one drop to the affected area and you’ll be in business. It’s great oil for multiple uses. Use this product on your gun, your fishing rods, and your pocketknife. 3. Break-Free CLP-4 Cleaner Lubricant Preservative Break-Free has several high-quality products in our table above. This Break-Free oil topped all of its sister products, and here’s why! This lubricant has built-in corrosion inhibitors that are designed to preserve and protect your firearm. Even if your arm is old, this oil will ensure that rust stays away. It’s quite viscous but it certainly isn’t thick! It’ll hold quite well in cold or humid environments. You’ll be able to shoot wherever you please! Even in dirty conditions, this lubricant will keep your gun shiny, protected, and usable. An added perk of this oil is that it has proven to hold up after being completely immersed in a pool of saltwater! That’s durability at its finest. This Break-Free product will certainly hold up in any condition. It’s a viable option for a gun owner who wants to maintain his/her firearm for decades of use.

The BCM QRF Review: Can Quadrails Still Rock?

The BCM QRF Review: Can Quadrails Still Rock?

There are certain builds that cannot aesthetically work with M-Lok. Call me one to wax poetic of the A2 and A4 series of rifles, but slim modular rails don’t look appropriate. They also aren’t as robust as quad rails. It’s true. With more screws, the more potential we have to have screws loosen. It’s just what they do. I must bow to practicality however… in the age of the lightweight rifle, quads don’t make as much sense. Except when they do. We need to thank Bravo Co. for releasing a quad rail in a market that has largely moved away from the cheese-grater system. How does it stack up to other quads on the market? Glad you asked! First Impressions: The BCM QRF is a standard not-so-standard quad rail. It’s standard in that it has 4 rows of picatinny rails. It’s not so standard in that it is among the lightest quads on the market, shaving every ounce possible. With the Daniel Defense M4 rail no longer in production, I believe the QRF is one of the lightest, if not the lightest quads on the market. The unique thing I noted is that the tube of the rail is still one piece and circular, but the picatinny rails which are on the exterior are hollowed out from the inside. The finish is a nice flat black and the rails are de horned well enough. It’s still sharp enough to take skin off a knuckle when installing rail panels. Ask me how I know. BCM makes a solid product, but the current market is ruthless; companies are constantly trying to one up and out-design each other. Rails, stocks, and triggers are likely the biggest group of products that see new designs put out constantly. So how does the QRF compare to whats on the market? Quad Rail Comparison: First lets breakdown some popular rails by weight. Larue 12.0 –  16.8 oz with hardware. Geissele Mk7 – 27.1 oz with hardware. BCM 12 inch QRF –  14.1 oz with hardware. Centurion C4 12 inch – 15.3 with hardware. You can see that we have a very lightweight system indeed. Having owned a G Mk4, Larue 12.0, and having installed many other designs that are not quad rails, I have a pretty good handle on the various ways you can attach a hand-guard to a standard receiver. I am pleased with the simplicity of the BCM installation, and the overall fit and finish is excellent. The QRF uses a replaceable anti-rotation system that is comprised of a steel tab. Many competing designs use aluminum tabs that extend from the aluminum rail itself. Which is stronger? Well, steel is a stronger material, but strength also depends on how thick material A is vs B. In this case, I think the design choice was quite smart. Not only can we replace the steel tab if the rail manages to get rotated out of wack, but the steel itself is a stronger material than aluminum anyway. Stronger and replaceable? (Que Tony Tiger) “That’s GREAAT!” The barrel nut is a steel component that does not require timing to the gas tube. BCM includes (yet another) proprietary barrel wrench. The attachment system is well thought out considering the other designs on the market. What I like about BCM’s design is that it interfaces with the barrel nut with about 330 ish degrees of contact. There is lots of rail to barrel nut contact. The rail slides over the entire barrel nut like a tube over a tube. The force required to slide the rail onto the nut was a rubber mallet and some patience. Once in place, two opposing torx screws tighten over shaped nuts which presumably apply more pressure on to the barrel nut through the wall of the rail. The two opposing screws prevent the rail from slipping fore or aft via a notch in the barrel nut. As an overview, the upper receiver interface components (barrel nut, hardware, anti rotation components) get a thumbs up. The simplicity speaks to me . Compared to Larue which uses a locking plate, locking collar, anti rotation plate, needs to be timed to the receiver, etc. The BCM is easier to install and is several oz lighter. Even thought the 12.0 as been on sale for a long time, it’s still more expensive than the BCM QRF. Now lets compare to the Geissele MK7 with its steel barrel nut, two bolts, threaded plate, and anti rotation set screws… This is more comparable in design philosophy, but G rails are overly bulky at the barrel nut area in my opinion, especially now with the re-designed staggered bolt system. The price of the MK7 Quadrail is a staggering $375. The MK7 also weighs 27 oz with hardware. Let it be known that the MK7 is purpose built for High Power so weight wasn’t a design concern. That said… I would not put a MK7 on a practical gun and even on a precision build the HBAR weight plus the Mk7 would be out of the question for me. Some might prefer to go as heavy as possible, but I have a personal limit and my 9lb Colt HBAR pushes that limit with the QRF installed. Personal preference. So for simplicity coupled with reduced weight and lower cost… so far this is my favorite quad rail of those I have seen and installed. The centurion looks very comparable, so if one ever makes it my way look out for a head to head. In Use I first tried to install the QRF on to my A2 rifle. No go. The receiver dimensions are not compatible with the anti rotation tab of the QRF. So off it came and on to my High Power / Precision build. Wrapped around the Colt HBAR, the QRF felt solid, and I appreciated the aesthetics and the build quality of this quadrail system. The barrel is perfectly centered in the rail and the rifle feels solid. The ergonomics are excellent; the rail feels great with both grip panels and/ or Larue Index clips. I decided to test the BCM QRF for deflection. This is a test of the rails overall stiffness when the rail is under a load. This represents a potential zero shift when range finders, and IR lasers. To preform this test, I installed a 3-10 mil/mil optic in its standard position on the receiver and co-witnessed it with my DIO red dot on the QRF at position T 40. I remained at 3x on my optic to ensure dot sharpness and co-witnessed the red dot in the center of the cross-hairs. I then placed the setup on a Caldwell rest at the rear of the rail butted up against the magazine well, and attached a 10 lb weight on the last available slot forward on the QRF. Keeping my face in a fixed position on the stock, I raised and lowered the front of the firearm and 10lb weight 5 times to ensure I was seeing the same movement. Worst Case Scenario. I had to dial the following vertical clicks into my optic to re-zero the red dot during the 5 attempts: 3clicks 3clicks 4clicks 4clicks 3clicks. Ergo my perception of rail to optic movement was between 3/10s and 4/10s of a mil with a full 10 lbs of weight hanging off the gun. Certainly a worst case scenario as no equipment we might utilize weighs ten lbs. This places the QRF between 1.08 inches and 1.44 inches of deflection at 100 yards with a 10 lb weight on a 12.65 inch QRF. I then tested the deflection with only my body weight leaning on the gun which was positioned on a caldwell rest in a “bipod” type arrangement as if I was shooting prone. Bipod Position The bipod position revealed very little in the way of movement. When the weight was removed and the gun rested on the Caldwell rail at the most forward position on the rail, I would safely say it resulted in 1 click of adjustment or .36 inches at 100 yards of deflection using only my body weight on the rear of the rifle. This is excellent for anyone who wants to use a QRF for IR lasers and other objects attached to the rail that need to maintain zero. This is a stiff product and you should have full confidence that even though it is lightweight, it is also as stiff as you could possibly want a rail to be. Wrapping Up: Looking back over the years at the various rail setups that 20 inch guns have had, it’s plain to see that quadrails and long barrels are falling out of favor. It’s nice to have new options available that are built specifically to fit a 20 inch, FSB pattern rifle. The QRF went with me to the range and there was no event which made me question overall function. Quads can still be useful, and I have a personal theory that they may be in fact stiffer than M-Lok systems which we will evaluate once I obtain a MCMR rail of similar length. Giving your 20 a new quad rail that reduces weight and keeps the lines of the classic M16A4 is not a bad thing. At $180 ish dollars I think the QRF is a great deal for anyone who still wants to rock a quad. This rail is High Power legal so my HBAR build will pull double duty. Watch for it as I attempt to get back into High-Power. Kids have kept me sidelines for the last few years. I will be adding more BCM rail systems to rifles to standardize in the future. Disclaimer: I purchaed this rail from Brownells.com and paid cash money; at no point did I have any promotional relationship with BCM. All thoughts an opinions are my own. Lothaen Out! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Best .300 Blackout Lower Receivers 2020 Top Picks

Best .300 Blackout Lower Receivers  2020 Top Picks

If you’re looking for the best .300 Blackout lower receiver, you might have a difficult task ahead of you. However, you don’t have to worry about wasting time or money if you know exactly what you’re looking for. To help you along with your search, we’ve handpicked five of the best .300 Blackout lower receivers on the market right now. These are quality receivers made to serve a purpose. But not all of them are created equal. So it’s up to you to decide which one will best fit your rifle and personal preferences. Before we unveil our list, we’ll talk about the .300 Blackout and how compatible it is with AR-15s. We’ll also take a look at some of the aspects you’ll need to consider while finding a lower receiver of your own. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for 300 Blackout Lower Receivers OUR TOP PICK: PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower PSA AR-15 Complete Rifle Lower Receiver A2 PSA AR-15 Complete MOE EPT SBA3 Lower PSA AR-15 Complete Classic Lower BEST BUDGET OPTION: PSA AR-15 Lower Safe/Fire Comparison Chart of the Best . "300 Blackout Lower" Receivers IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower Staked Locknut Magpul MOE Stock and Grip Buttstock Included for Recoil Resistance and Support View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews PSA AR-15 Complete "Rifle Lower Receiver" A2 Includes Pistol Grip and Buttstock Fits Most AR Rifles, Regardless of Caliber Machined From High-Quality Aluminum Forging "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" PSA AR-15 Complete MOE EPT SBA3 Lower Enhanced Polished Trigger "Machined From High" -Quality Aluminum Forgings Comes With a Magpul Black Grip for Superior Control View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews PSA AR-15 "Complete Classic Lower" Fits Multiple Caliber AR Rifles Machined from 7075 Aluminum M4 Stock for Added Support and Recoil Resistance View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option PSA AR-15 Lower Safe/Fire Fits Most Calibers Safe/Fire Feature for Safeties Crafted From High-Quality Aluminum View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews 300 Blackout’s Compatibility With AR-15 When the .300 Blackout burst onto the scene years ago, AR-15 owners and enthusiasts were quick to embrace it. One of the reasons is that the .300 Blackout, especially its rifles, were able to allow AR-15 magazines to fit without any issues. Actually, let’s rephrase that. It can handle pretty much every standard AR-15 part and accessory you can possibly think of. Source But can you fire .300 Blackout cartridges in AR-15 magazines built for other rounds? If you have a magazine that is built to take on 5.56 NATO rounds, then the answer is yes. However, it probably won’t be compatible if you have a magazine that typically chambers .223 rounds. What parts need to be changed to help accommodate Blackout cartridges? Once again, 5.56 rifles may not apply to any possible adjustments. But a .223 caliber rifle may need to be fully converted to handle such rounds. What Are The Components of a Lower Receiver? To know the ins and outs of a lower receiver, you need to know some of the parts that comprise of it. In short, the lower receiver contains the fire control group of your .300 Blackout rifle . The same applies for this part on any other AR-15 rifle. The lower receiver is made of the trigger, disconnector, fire selector, magazine catch, and the hammer. In plain English, the trigger assembly and the magazine are the two most important components that are housed in the lower receiver. It is also secured to the upper receiver using two pins. The split design of having two receivers will allow the upper part to have more customization abilities. What Makes a Great .300 Blackout Lower Receiver? Before choosing a lower receiver for your .300 Blackout rifle, you have to know what exactly makes one great compared to the cheap, low-quality models. We recommend that you take some time while choosing one so you can find the best that is great in quality and also efficient in doing its intended purpose. If you have no idea what to look for, here’s a list of recommendations based on what past buyers have said: Does it Fit Your Barrel? The important question to ask yourself is: will this fit my barrel perfectly? Remember, not all .300 Blackout barrels are of the same length. Some are as short as nine inches, while others are as long as 20 inches or more. Either way, you need to find a lower receiver that will accommodate a barrel that is of the specified length. Source s Installation Of course, not every .300 Blackout owner will be a skilled gunsmith. So it’s important to find a product that will allow you to install it with ease. Some use of tools may be required, but it should be easy enough you don’t have to enlist the services of a professional gunsmith. The key word to look for in your search for a lower receiver is “drop in”. In plain English, this translates into easy to install. Does it Fit Your Upper? A good lower can’t stay in place if you can’t find an upper that is compatible. It is highly recommended that if you find a lower receiver from a certain brand, find an upper from them. Not all uppers from the same brand fit perfectly, so it’s important to do a little in-depth research to figure out which one will be compatible with the lower receiver you choose. Quick Take - The Best .300 Blackout Lower Receivers - These are our recommendations for the best .300 Blackout lower receivers: PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower PSA AR-15 Complete Rifle Lower Receiver A2 PSA AR-15 Complete MOE EPT SBA3 Lower Review of the Best .300 Blackout Lower Receivers Below are the five best .300 Blackout lower receivers currently on the market right now. The important thing to know is that while all of them have a purpose, each is different in some way or another. Prior to making a decision, read through each one of these reviews carefully. You might find one to be a suitable replacement for your current lower receiver. Or, if you're building a rifle, this is the perfect time to find a lower receiver that will look good and function well once the rifle is complete. With that said, let's get started: Best Overall: PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Pairs Perfectly With Most PSA Uppers Secured Properly in All the Right Places Trigger Pull is Great. No Creep to Speak of Cons Some Say the Trigger Pull is a Little Heavier Than Expected Some Complained About the Stock Being Very Loose and Sloppy Our first lower receiver up for review is the PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower. To begin, you'll notice that this is a super strong and durable lower. That's because it is crafted from high-quality 7075 aluminum. You'll be seeing this kind of aluminum in most lower receivers and other parts as well. This type of aluminum is perhaps one of the strongest materials used by manufacturers. Not only is this designed to be just a lower receiver, but it also comes with the convenient little addition. That addition is none other than a buttstock made from synthetic materials designed to help the stock reduce recoil and absorb shock. .300 Blackout rifles do pack a heavy punch, so expect the buttstock to help in reducing as much recoil as possible. Equipped with this product is a PSA AR15/PA10 trigger. This trigger is a mil-spec trigger that is nickel finished and provides a smooth, crisp pull each time you use it. If you want to get a shot off quickly, you want a trigger with a light amount of pull weight but just enough for you to not apply too much pressure. If you’re looking for a reliable product for your .300 Blackout, the PSA AR-15 MOE EPT Lower might be your best possible choice. Bottom Line The PSA lower receiver has proven itself to be deserving of the best overall honor. We don’t regret that in the slightest. While the trigger pull may be an area of concern for some users, it can still pull just as well as any other mil-spec trigger on the market. The buttstock is a perfect inclusion with this item and will definitely save you some money as opposed to purchasing a buttstock separately. If you’re looking for the best of the best when it comes to lower receivers, the PSA AR-15 MOE may very well be the one you choose. Runner-up: PSA AR-15 Complete Rifle Lower Receiver A2 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to Install A Great Alternative for Users Who Don’t Like Adjustable Stocks Can Eliminate a Lot of Recoil With the Pairing of a Good Muzzle Brake Cons The Overall Fit May Not Be as Tight as Expected Some Have Complained About the Stock Being a Little Loose Some Are Not Too Happy With the Trigger Installed on This Lower Next, we'll be taking a look at the PSA AR-15 Complete Rifle Lower Receiver A2. Compared to our previous product, this stock is designed to look like a standard rifle stock. If that's the kind of design you want for your .300 Blackout rifle, this might be worth looking into. This is machined from aluminum forging that is designed to be tough as nails and able to handle the duties of a powerful rifle like an AR rifle capable of firing off .300 Blackout rounds. This will not only fit .300 Blackout rifles but will also work with multiple caliber AR rifles. It doesn't matter if it's a 5.56 or a .223, this product is versatile and can fit pretty much any rifle in the AR category. If you have other AR rifles, it might be worth getting an extra one if you got some money to work with. The lower receiver includes the usual trigger assembly but also includes a pistol grip and buttstock that is designed to give you better control over your .300 Blackout rifle. Remember, if you have good control and the ability to resist a good deal of recoil, your rifle can be dangerous in terms of accuracy. If you hold accuracy to a high standard, this might be able to help you control your rifle and reduce as much recoil as possible. Bottom Line This PSA lower receiver gives you the classic look and function of a rifle. If that’s something that you hold a deep appreciation for, then you’ll have no problem choosing this over the others. As mentioned before, this is compatible with just about any other AR rifle out there. So the versatility and the ability to work with these rifles is quite impressive. If you’re looking for a go-to lower receiver for all your other AR rifles (if you have any others in your collection), go with this PSA product. Best For The Money: PSA AR-15 Complete MOE EPT SBA3 Lower CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easily Adjustable Trigger Pull is Crisp and Creep-Free Collapses Smoothly Like Many Other Adjustable or Collapsible Stocks Cons Some Have Had Issues About the Safety Selector Being a Little Crooked Some Are Not Happy With the Aluminum Factory Trigger That is Included Upper and Lower Fit Should be Tighter. It Would Depend on Which Upper is Paired With This Lower in Particular If you’re on a budget, don’t consider yourself left out. You’ll be able to find a decent lower receiver for your .300 Blackout rifle. And what better one to find than the PSA AR-15 Complete MOE EPT SBA3 Lower? This product is made from high-quality aluminum and has a receiver extension made from the same type of aluminum. Of course, this will withstand the punishment a .300 Blackout rifle can dish out. This has an enhanced, polished trigger designed to give you a mil-spec style pull, meaning the trigger pull will be slightly heavier than most, but you’ll still be able to get a no-creep trigger pull each time. The buttstock is designed to absorb a great deal of shock and to give you the best in overall rifle control. If you’re looking for a product that is reliable and won’t break the bank, you should give the SBA3 lower a closer look. This is compatible with most PSA brand uppers, so if you need an upper as well, kill two birds with one stone and get this lower along with an upper that can accommodate each other. Bottom Line If you're looking for an excellent lower receiver that fits your budget, this will no doubt be the best option for you. The collapsible stock is convenient for those who don't want to struggle with dealing with a so-called "one size fits all stock". If you want the reach of your .300 Blackout rifle to be dead-on with the right adjustments, this stock will offer you that luxury. As expected, this is more than those usual "you get what you pay for" kind of accessories. We only find the best in quality at a price that will fit most budgets, because quality and performance shouldn't be reduced just because of the price tag. 4. PSA AR-15 Complete Classic Lower CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Great Durability for a Military-Style Lower Receiver Fits "Perfectly With Most" Pre-Assembled PSA Uppers Excellent Lower Receiver Alternative for Budget Shoppers Cons Trigger is a Little Gritty Upon Initial Use "Some Have Complained" About the Trigger Pull Next, we’ll be taking a look at the AR-15 Complete Classic Lower. Aside from the material it is machined from, this includes an M4 stock designed to give you maximum support and the ability to resist as much recoil as possible. Since the material is synthetic, this will have the ability to withstand a good deal of shock. On top of that, this can also handle the worst weather conditions you can find yourself in. If you’re out on the range or in the field and it’s raining like crazy, you won’t have to worry about the stock getting damaged. The good news is that this can fit almost any caliber within the AR category, including .300 Blackout rifles. The even better news is this puppy is fully-assembled and ready to go just as soon as you install it. If you want a classic lower that will function properly right out of the box, this is the one you’ll want to have on your rifle. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a good, fully-assembled product for your .300 Blackout, this complete classic lower may be your best option. Everything is assembled and in place, ready to go once it is installed. The installation process is quick, so you might be able to give this a whirl on the same day. This is also a good product to have if you want something that’s as close to a military style as possible. 5. PSA AR-15 Lower Safe/Fire CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent as a Starter Lower Receiver A Well-Machined, Durable Lower Receiver Functions Very Well After 200+ Rounds Without Issue Cons Some Have Complained About Issues With the Trigger One Reviewer Complained About This Lower Being Loose in Fit One Reviewer Has Complained About the Trigger Pin Not Staying in Place For our last lower receiver on the list, we'll be taking a look at the AR-15 Lower Safe/Fire. The material this is made from is technology designed from an unlikely industry. More specifically, we're talking the aerospace industry. If you decide to go with this product and you're satisfied, you'll have to thank the fine folks at NASA for developing the technology responsible for putting this together. Aside from that, this has a safety that will let you know when it's safe and when it's live and ready to fire (hence the name Safe/Fire). Aside from that, this is crafted from high-quality aluminum and is designed to fit a .300 Blackout rifle and even other rifles within the AR category. For added durability, the anodized black finish is added, so this will be a tough as nails kind of lower receiver that will last you a good while. Bottom Line The Safe/Fire feature is a convenient addition to this lower receiver. If you’re looking for something that will fit perfectly with something like an ambidextrous trigger, this might be the one that could do the trick. Other than that, this is one tough customer designed to last you a good deal of time so long as you take great care of it .300 Blackout rifle and clean it as often as every 500 rounds. Take care of your rifle and your rifle will take care of you no matter the purpose you use it for. Conclusion Finding the best .300 Blackout lower receiver doesn’t have to be a challenge. It’s important to find one that will last you a long time and is able to fit properly with an upper of your choice. Since all of these are of the PSA brand, it’s highly recommended that you should pair the lower of your choice with an upper from PSA. Once you have it put together, you’ll be ready for action and so will your .300 Blackout rifle.

1911 80% Tactical Machining Build, Part 4: Basic Fitting

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Fitting? My parts list in Part 3 of this guide minimizes the necessary fitting of parts to the frame and each other, but there’s still a lot to do for a 80% 1911 project.  I’ve gone ahead and done all the fitting possible while I wait for my Tactical Machining 1911 80% Jig. For more help, I’d check out the book & DVD I listed. Disclaimer again. Barrel Bushing to Slide Fit I started blogging after I did this, so some of the pictures are “after” pictures.  My apologies! The combo of a pre-fit Lake Storm barrel and my Fusion Firearms slide was perfect.  The barrel fit so exactly that I was actually kind of scared something was over-sized, but I just had to get it in the exact angle. 1911 Storm Lake Barrel Fitting The barrel bushing was already pre-fit snugly to the barrel so all I had to do was see if the bushing fit into the slide.  It wasn’t going in easily so I just kept at it for 5-10 minutes until the entire bushing could go down.  I didn’t want to file/sand anything unless I had to. Locking the bushing looked like it needed some filing.  I double-checked by turning by hand as much as possible.  There were some shiny parts on the bushing which told me one part was too thick.  I then used some Sharpie (or Dykem) to see where the color wore off. 1911 Barrel Bushing Fitting I used one of my flat files and went at both sides a little, then repeated the Sharpie procedure.  This went on for about 30 minutes.  You can see by my handiwork I didn’t exactly keep everything level.  The next time I would probably vise the bushing. Completed 1911 Barrel Fitting Trigger Fitting Edit: Article on Installing and Fitting 1911 Triggers . The Wilson Ultralight Match Trigger was not going in so I did the Sharpie method and ended up filing a decent amount off the top and bottom, and a little off the sides.  From the videos, you could also possibly see some resistance from the trigger bow.  I also sanded the inside of the frame a little since it looked like there were some sharp burrs. 1911 Trigger Fitting The trigger fits very snugly now and doesn’t seem to have any drag.  I finished with increasing sandpaper grit to smooth out all the trigger surfaces I filed.  There are still some minor streaks that mark up the trigger but I’ll deal with any final finishing after I know the pistol works. Completed "1911 Trigger Fitting" Beavertail Fitting I originally got a Wilson Drop-In Beavertail but it left a quarter-inch gap on the TM 1911 80%.  I exchanged it for a regular Wilson Beavertail which fits well enough to not need filing for proper function.  But a properly blended beavertail is really one of the marks of a custom 1911.  I’ll leave it until I get the jig and make the frame 100% first…just in case. 1911 Beavertail Fitting Top "1911 Beavertail Fitting" Bottom Next Lesson Part 1: Intro (Finding the 80%) Part 2: Tools Part 3: Parts List Part 4: Basic Fitting Part 5: Cutting the Slide Rail Part 6: Barrel Seating Part 7: Hammer & Sear Pin Holes Part 8: Fitting the Slide Part 9: Assembly & Fitting Part 10: GunKote Application Learning Resources

Before You Buy: Two Oddball Revolvers

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d201b603_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d201b603_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Oddballs like myself are drawn to oddball guns. Two of the most interesting revolvers I’ve ever shot have been the 40 S&W/10mm Model 610 revolver from Smith & Wesson, which had an MSRP of $661 when I bought one 10 years ago, and a Freedom Arms’ Premier-grade single-action 5-shooter in .41 Magnum, which was listed at $1,673 in 1998. Various versions of this pair have been listed in GDTM’s pages over the past few months, but never in much volume. That’s not surprising, since both wheelguns are oddball chamberings for revolvers. But to its credit, Smith still lists the 610, though its MSRP has jumped almost 50 percent, to $980 for either the 4- or 6.5-inch-barrel model, the latter of which is like my former gun. The current version of the 6.5-inch gun is No. 150278 in S&W’s catalog. Freedom Arms likewise still catalogs a 41 Remington Magnum, and its price hasn’t gone up much in the last decade. The Model 97 No. 905-17 comes in three barrel lengths (4.25, 5.5, and 7.5 inch), and all three sell for $1772. If you’re an oddball, too, and you would consider buying either of these guns, here’s what you need to know. Ammo Shortage Related GunDigest Articles Recommended Nightstand Guns - Part 2: Revolvers Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Though the S&W 610 is a modern single-action/double-action design and the Freedom Arms .41 mag is single-action only, both guns suffer from a lack of available commercial ammunition, despite the 610 shooting both the .40 S&W round and 10mm cartridges. Certainly, these guns would benefit from handloaded ammunition. Velocities from the .41 Magnum rounds were impressive. The Federal Hunting 250-grain Castcore ran 1,258 fps, but it was topped (naturally) by the lighter Federal Classic 210-grain Hi-Shok jacketed hollowpoints at 1,466 fps and Winchester 175-grain Silvertip hollowpoints at 1,384 fps. The 40s and 10mms weren’t bad. Winchester 180-grain full-metal-jacket 40 S&Ws traveled 1,035 fps, similar to the Black Hills 180-grain JHP 40 S&W at 1,032 fps. Hornady 155-grain JHP 10mms were the fastest at 1,389 fps, followed by American Eagle 180-grain 10mm lead bullets (1,072 fps), Blazer 200-grain TMJ 10mms (1,045 fps), and Eldorado Starfire 180-grain JHP 10mm, (956 fps). S&W 610 Details The 610 was a handsome stainless-steel six-shooter. Despite its 6.5-inch barrel with full underlug, it had a compact, solid feel. The double-action pull was too heavy for rapid-fire situations, but the Smiths are famous for responding to the gunsmith’s touch. The 610 was a moon-clip gun, that is, the ammunition is held together by a steel clip that contacts the cylinder in front of the breech face. I thought the Hogue Mono-grip with finger grooves was excellent for double-action use. The gun’s front sight was a serrated ramp with orange insert and the rear was a white-outlined rear notch. Together, they could be confusing.

Summary

Our “9mm vs. 45” Survival debate was a popular one, so we’re going to take it one step further and go to the ultimate U. S.