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Love it or hate it. Airsoft has become a quickly growing sport for youngsters looking for the next level of action outside of games like Call of Duty or Battlefield. While many are quick to hate on the sport and how it tends to breed knock off products, there is however a use for such technology.

Training with Airsoft: A Beginners Guide to Guns and Gear

Training with Airsoft: A Beginners Guide to Guns and GearLove it or hate it. Airsoft has become a quickly growing sport for youngsters looking for the next level of action outside of games like Call of Duty or Battlefield. While many are quick to hate on the sport and how it tends to breed knock off products, there is however a use for such technology. For many it is essentially the modern equivalent of the BB gun of American youth. You’ll shoot your eye out kid! When I first became exposed to the sport I was 16 or 17 and the War in the Middle East was in full swing. The first rifle I picked up was a Armalite Licensed Classic Army M15A4 CQB. Back then short guns  had just become a thing and I went to Airsoft Extreme to pick one up with my Uncle. The quality of guns back then were pretty good in 2006 but ten years later they are light years ahead. I played casually for a few years before enlisting in the Army where I later went on to serve in the 82nd Airborne Division, 78th Signal Battalion, 112th Signal Battalion (SO) A. Why choose Airsoft to train? First off Airsoft is not a replacement for other training methods but it has its share of strengths that can add to an overall training experience. Nothing will replace live fire in the near future and that should be a staple in any training regiment. As effective as range time can be, paper and steel typically don’t run around and shoot back at you. Airsoft is also very clean and quite safe when compared to paintball or other projectile based training weapons. While many units still use UTM and SIM rounds to train they are quite expensive and from what I have seen lose range and accuracy very quickly. Airsoft is extremely affordable and has become quite an attractive offering for those wanting to use it for force on force or flat range shooting on the cheap. A bag or bottle of 5000 bbs can cost roughtly $10-$15. The projectile itself will typically fly straight and level for 150-250 feet out which is more than capable of hitting a man size target. The guns themselves range in type and variety but a nice quality training replica with recoil will set you back $279 before you start adding all your cool toys and accessories. You can get cheaper airsoft guns that will probably do the job but the one I recommend is the Electric Recoil Gun.  Once you have the correct battery and charger all you need is some eyepro and face protection if you choose not to loose any teeth. If you are just running drills indoors (recommend someplace easy to clean like a garage or backyard) you can shoot at static targets just like you would at any range without fear of live bullets ricocheting and flying back at you. If you can’t make it to a range and don’t feel like spending money on gas/ammo/Range fees then Airsoft is perfect train at home option. With the wide array of Airsoft products that are officially licensed you can essentially create a 1:1 replica of your real rifle or handgun in Airsoft. What kind of Airsoft Guns are available? AEG – Airsoft Electric Gun. The AEG is a battery powered 6mm airsoft gun. The bread and butter of the industry these are the most commonly found replicas on the market. AEGs are affordable but do not offer the level of realism like a GBB. Running of what are essentially RC Car batteries these are easy to pickup and play. HPA – High Pressure Air.These have unique systems that are tethered to an airtank to deliver the same ammount of air pressure every time. Very consistent but very expensive even for Airsoft to setup and for Training not very realistic. GBB – The most realistic but also expensive. Gas Blow Back guns operate exactly like the real thing with full bolt carriers cycling every time the guns are fired. Not very cheap and the magazine costs add up. A top choice for training but the gas system can fluctuate in performance with temperature (Cold means worse performance). These operate using Green Gas or C02. ERG – Electric Recoil Gun. Essentially an AEG with a recoil system and cut off feature built in. These offer recoil like a GBB but without the hassle of filling each magazine with gas or other propellant. They run of batteries like the AEG but will stop firing when the magazine is out of ammo. The user would have to reload and hit the bolt catch to make the rifle function again. This is the best and most reliable option that has the best features of the bunch. I have included a few links to recommended products and some resources with more extensive beginner knowledge on how to use airsoft guns. All Airsoft guns also have what is known as a Hop Up. It is a dial inside the gun (normally where the star chamber is) that gives back spin to the projectile. More backspin and the BB will arc upwards. Not enough and it will ark down. Just right will keep the BB level when flying to the target. ELECTRIC RECOIL GUN http://www.evike.com/products/58791/ ERG MAGAZINES PTS RM4 PMAG 30/60 rounds, 3 Pack http://www.evike.com/products/44071/ BATTERY BUTTSTOCK http://www.evike.com/products/66539/ PTS Enhanced Polymer Stock (EPS) BATTERY http://www.evike.com/products/47095/ AMMO http://www.evike.com/products/29286/ RAIL SYSTEMS http://www.airsoftgi.com/product_info.php?products_id=29104 http://www.evike.com/products/49916/ PTS Centurion Arms C4 Rail 9in BLK RESOURCES: http://www.airsoftgi.com/information.php?info_id=40 www.airsoftgi.com/information.php?info_id=43 -Greg

Gun Review: Barrett MRAD

Gun Review: Barrett MRAD

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cd988dbc_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cd988dbc_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Barrett Multi-Role Adaptive Design (MRAD) rifle. Designed for the military, the versatile Barrett MRAD rifle is finding acceptance among all long-range shooters. Nine companies stepped up to the challenge to design their versions of the Precision Sniper Rifle when the United States Special Operations Command published Performance Specifications for the PSR back in late 2009. The Barrett MRAD – Multi- "Role Adaptive Design" – quickly joined the competition for the coveted government contract. Even though the Barrett MRAD was a runner-up in the final competition, it still served as a strong performer that continues to find acceptance with serious long-range accuracy hounds, foreign militaries and domestic SWAT teams. The Barrett MRAD was specifically designed to meet the needs of the "Precision Sniper Rifle" (PSR) program, which includes a set of requirements by the "United States Special" Operations Command (USSOCOM) that states the current system mission of the PSR is to enable USSOCOM snipers to use one or more shots to interdict enemy personnel, positions and nontechnical vehicles mounted with crew served weapons out to 1,500 meters or further, and to defeat NIJ Level III body armor out to 900 meters in its .338 Lapua Magnum configuration. Other PSR parameters encompass length, weight, magazine capacity, penetration of the projectile, the ability to mount night vision devices and other accessories. Goal of the Barrett MRAD With superior accuracy, low recoil and a utilitarian design, the MRAD is a do-it-all rifle. To get an idea of what the Barrett MRAD is all about, a review of the USSOCOM Performance Specifications for the PSR tells the story. A PSR was specified to be no longer than 50 inches fully extended without suppressor, with the ideal set at 40 inches overall length. With the stock folded, the maximum length is 40 inches, with 36 set as the objective of USSOCOM. The threshold weight for the weapon with a M1913 rail and a 10-round unloaded magazine is 18 pounds, and the objective weight is no greater than 13 pounds. The MRAD submitted for the PSR trial was fitted with a 24.5-inch barrel and weighed 14.8 pounds without an optic. Related GunDigest Articles AR-15 Review: Get Tactical in 2015 Gun Review: YHM's Hunt-Ready Carbine Gun Review: Seekins Precision SP10 The MRAD submitted for the PSR was a 24.5-inch fluted version. So was the one tested for this article. Barrel lengths between 20 and 27 inches are available in . "338 Lapua Magnum" . The MRAD features a monolithic chassis with a 30 MOA taper MIL STD 1913 rail that measures 21.75 inches and offers plenty of space for in-line night vision devices. Side and bottom rails allow for mounting a number of other accessories. It includes two configurable 4-inch Picatinny rails and an 8-inch rail, all of which can be mounted along the 3, 6 and 9 o’clock surfaces on the forward part of the upper receiver. The bottom of the buttstock also has a M1913 rail for mounting a monopod. The MRAD’s stock is foldable for enhanced portability, yet locks in as solid as a fixed-stock rifle. When folded, the stock latches around the bolt handle for added security during transport. Made of a temperature-resistant polymer, the adjustable cheek piece also offers a consistent rifle-to-user contact point. Length of pull can be set to five different positions with the push of a single button. One of the objectives of the PSR is caliber modularity. The .338 Lapua Magnum is one of the most widely used cartridges by militaries around the world that meet the PSR’s cartridge ballistic requirements. One key advantage of a switch-barrel rifle is economical: barrels can be swapped to practice with cheaper ammo at the range. Currently, the .300 Winchester Magnum is in use with all of the M24s and the M2010, which is a conversion of the M24 from .308. The military also wants to retain the ability to shoot 7.62 NATO for cost-effective training. The MRAD is offered with barrels for each caliber. The MRAD also boasts Barrett’s new trigger module that is accessible for maintenance, adjustment and replacement. This is a match-grade trigger that is adjustable from 3 to 5 pounds of let-off. The trigger on the test gun was 3 pounds, but is adjustable from 2.5 to 5 pounds.

How-To: Improve Accuracy With Minor Scope Adjustments

How-To: Improve Accuracy With Minor Scope Adjustments

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d79e5cb8_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d79e5cb8_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Improved accuracy can be as simple as a few scope adjustments to sharpen your view and relieve eye strain. Some things to know about focus and your rifle's scope: Many riflescopes are improperly fitted to the shooter. A simple adjustment almost always results in improved accuracy. Ocular focus ensures the reticle is properly focused for your eye. Properly adjusted, your eye won’t strain trying to focus on the reticle. Parallax is where objects at different distances appear to change position when your head moves. Many scopes have parallax adjustment knobs to place reticle and target on the same focal plane. Most of my students have had one thing wrong with the setup of their rifles when they start a course (this includes military and police snipers, as well as recreational shooters). The improper setup has a direct impact on their ability to shoot as good as they should and, once we change it, there’s almost always an instant improvement. This means that there’s a good chance you have this problem, too — and it just might be holding you back. The common issue is not having the riflescope adjusted for the particular shooter. This doesn’t just apply to having the scope mounted in the correct position or the stock’s cheek piece (comb) adjusted to the proper height. The most common error I see is not properly adjusting the scope’s ocular focus to the shooter’s eye. What Is Ocular Focus? The ocular focus ensures that the reticle in the scope is properly focused for your eye. It’s typically adjusted by turning the adjustment ring closest to your eye; however, sometimes the entire ocular housing must be turned. If your eye becomes fatigued, or if you have trouble keeping the reticle in focus while you’re shooting, this is likely a problem on your riflescope. Related GunDigest Articles Classic Cartridges: Is The .30-06 Springfield All You Need? Modern Shooter: At H&H Precision Rifles' Shooting School New Optics: Bushnell Tac Optics Line The best way to adjust the ocular focus is to have a friend help, but it can be accomplished on your own. 1. First, have your friend place a white sheet of paper halfway down the barrel (or, if you don’t have any friends, position your rifle near a light-colored wall a few feet in front of the muzzle). 2. Next, get on the rifle with your eyes closed and only open your shooting eye once you’re in a comfortable position. If you need to adjust your head’s position in order to see clearly through the scope, that’s a good clue that you need to adjust your scope’s mounting position or adjust your cheek rest. 3. Once you can see clearly through the scope, quickly glance (one or two seconds) at the reticle and then close your eye. Then, make a bold adjustment to your ocular focus and re-open your eye for another quick glance. Make a determination on whether the reticle’s image/focus is better or worse than last time. There’s no need to over-think this process or make an overall determination immediately. Better or worse is all we care about right now. A quick glance is important — if you stare too long, then your eye will play a trick on you and work to focus the reticle’s image. Keep making bold adjustments to your ocular focus in each direction until you have figured out where the best/crisp image of the reticle is.

Tried & Dropped: Three Features You Wont Find on a Remington 870

Tried & Dropped: Three Features You Wont Find on a Remington 870

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2856752_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2856752_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } There are a number of things that were unique to the Remington Model 870 when it first appeared. The quick removable and completely interchangeable barrel system, the fire-control (trigger group) mechanism that could be removed with the mere punching out of two pins, and a couple other innovative features made the Model 870 unique for the times. All these have remained through the years, but there were a couple very unusual features that have not survived the test of time. The first of these was what Remington called the “Vari-Weight” plug system that was offered for the 12-gauge shotgun only. This was a metal plug that weighed around ¾-pound and could be inserted into the magazine tube to increase the weight of the gun and move the balance point forward. The early Model 870s, particularly the standard grade AP models, were fairly light, listed at 6¾ pounds. It was not unusual to get a gun that weighed even a bit less, depending on the density of wood and the barrel length. This was great for upland hunters, who always look for a lighter gun. But, for waterfowlers and clay target shooters, the gun was too light. By adding the Vari-Weight plug, the gun’s weight increased considerably and made the gun more nose heavy at the same time, an important feature for both these sportsmen. But Remington quietly dropped the Vari-Weight plug offering, which had come standard with all 12-gauges, in the 1960s, about the time the standard AP model was dropped. Related GunDigest Articles Video: The Short and Stout Remington 870 Tac-14 Gun Review: Remington 870 DM Shotgun Face-Off: Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870 A modified form of the old Vari-Weight plug was revived for the smallbore 28-gauges and .410-bores, when Remington came out with its scaled-frame guns, in 1969. They were first offered as a matched pair of skeet guns and had weights that would attach to the magazine cap to increase forward weight. In actuality, this system had been available much earlier, when Remington introduced its small-framed Model 11-48 autoloader in 28-gauge and .410-bore. When the small-framed 870s came out, Remington simply adopted the same system to the new pump guns. However, as it had been with the 12-gauge, this practice was also stopped after a while. Another feature offered for small-frame guns, as well as for the Model 870 LW 20-gauge, was the lightweight Honduras mahogany stock and forearm. The small-framed guns stocked as such weighed about a ¼-pound less than the later walnut-stocked guns. No doubt Remington stopped the practice of stocking in mahogany due to cost, but, in doing so, a truly delightful lightweight gun disappeared from the line. Of course, some would argue that a quarter of a pound isn’t much and, indeed, it is only about four ounces so involved. However, in a truly lightweight gun, four ounces can make a major difference, and many believe that the old Honduras mahogany stocked small-gauge Model 870s had superior handling qualities compared to the slightly heavier walnut stocked versions. Today, if you can locate one of these small-framed Model 870s with mahogany wood, they will cost at least 25-percent more than the walnut stocked versions.

The 4 Best Ankle Holsters for Glock 27 — Reviews 2020 Photo by B&A Photography / CC BY So you want an ankle holster for your Glock 27. Well, you’ve made a good choice. See, ankle holsters conceal a small firearm under the wearer’s pants, above the footwear.  The advantages are that you don’t have to wear a jacket over your shirt to conceal you gun, if you are in a hot climate, or if you work in an office environment where you can’t have your shirt untucked. For police officers, the ankle holster offers a place to hold their backup gun. Ankle holsters offer an advantage if you are seated in a vehicle, or at a desk, where drawing a firearm from a belt can be more difficult than from a standing position. Ankle holsters also offer high concealability, in that with the exception of those weirdoes with foot fetishes, most people do not look at people’s feet and ankles. Printing (the outline of the gun through clothes) will be negligible unless you are wearing yoga pants, and flashing, in which clothing rides up and exposes a gun, should not be a problem. Here are our recommendations for the 4 best ankle holsters for Glock 27 handguns on the market: Galco Ankle Glove / Ankle Holster for Glock 26, 27, 33 by Galco Gunleather "Galco Ankle Glove" /Ankle Holster for Glock 26, 27, 33 Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:40 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This product is made in the USA, and features a sheepskin lined neoprene band which fastens around the ankle with Velcro closures. The holster is made of black leather, and has a thumb break retention strap (Level II Retention, which means use of a restraining strap in addition to friction hold to keep the gun in place). The neoprene band will fit on people with up to 13 inch diameter ankles. Note how the neoprene sleeve conforms well to your leg to prevent slippage, and it is concealable under jeans or dress pants. You may want to try wearing short ankle socks, as over the calf socks can slide down, taking the holster with them. This holster is comfortable and doesn’t chafe or pull hairs out of your legs. There is a calf strap available–which is not included–that might be useful to keep the holster in place. Users have noted they have run and waded through water with this holster, and it stayed in place. (By the way, as a side note, Glocks keep working after immersion, even in saltwater.) DeSantis Glock 26/27/33 Apache Ankle Holster by DeSantis Gunhide RSR Group, Inc Desantis Glock 26/27/33 "Apache Ankle Holster" Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:40 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Simple, sleek, and durable are the best ways to describe this holster It is inexpensive and features a sheepskin lined elastic leg band for comfort and a snug fit. The holster is squared off rather than tapered, made of black nylon, and has a Velcro thumb break for Level II retention. It is inexpensive, comfortable to wear, offers maximum concealment with no printing, and holds the gun securely in place. Without a doubt, this is one of the best Glock 27 ankle holsters. Uncle Mike’s Law Enforcement Kodra Nylon Ankle Holster with Retention Strap Uncle Mike's Off-Duty and Concealment "Kodra Nylon Ankle" Holster Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:24 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This holster and ankle sleeve are made of durable Kodra (Cordura) nylon with Velcro closures, and has a Level II Velcro retention strap. All of the Velcro straps are very wide, for maximum grip, and the exterior of the holster is covered with Velcro, allowing the wearer to adjust the retention strap to their own preference for maximum hold. This rig also features a calf strap. Soft fabric and closed cell foam padding ensure comfort against the skin. It is comfortable and securely keeps your gun in place even when running. Don’t use the holster beyond the scope of its intended purposes. If you try wearing a .50 Desert Eagle on your ankle in this holster, you will be disappointed in this and probably any other ankle holster. A gun that is too big and heavy is not intended for carry in an ankle holster. Bear Armz Tactical Ankle Holster Ankle Holster for Concealed Carry | American Company | 4 Styles | B.U.G Leg Holster | Compatible with Glock 43, 42, 33, 30, 27, 26 S&W M&P Shield 9mm, Bodyguard .380, Ruger LCP, LC9, Sig Sauer Price: $13.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:40 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. This holster is made in the good old US of A. The holster is nylon, with Velcro closures and has a neoprene ankle sleeve which is noted to not stretch over time like elastic materials. It is very comfortable to wear, and has a Velcro retention strap. It is most comfortable with over the calf socks but don’t report slippage. It is inexpensive, and durable. Secure, discreet and solidly constructed are among the descriptions. Qualities to look for in the best ankle holster for Glock 27 pistols: Durability- you want to get years of use out of the holster, not spend money on something that is going to fall apart in a few months. Snug fit on the ankle so it doesn’t bounce or come loose when running or climbing stairs. Minimal printing for concealability. Slim profile so the pant leg can be moved out of the way for quick access. Comfort so you won’t hesitate to wear it (if you are going to carry, always carry), no chafing or abrasion on your skin. Price- the cost should justify the quality and amount of service you will get from it. Conclusion It is an understatement to say it is advisable to learn to draw from an ankle holster . Live training is of course the best choice; don’t rely on the University of YouTube for training for something so critical. You Tube videos are a great way to learn how to make a good pie crust, or to keep the rice from turning out sticky; not for learning how to respond in what could be a life or death matter for you are someone else. Practice, practice, practice to build muscle memory- the ability to draw quickly from an ankle holster must become a learned response which can be performed under stress. Do that, and your ankle-holstered Glock 27 can prove to be one of the most valuable things you own. Stay Safe. About the author: David A. Porter is an adjunct instructor in Criminal Justice, and a licensed clinician who provides substance abuse and anger management counseling to criminal offenders, and treatment of PTSD in victims of violent and sexually based crimes. He is a gun owner, avid shooter, and second amendment advocate. Boyd Smith Owner of Reloaderaddict.com, Boyd Smith is a major handgun enthusiast, and although he owns Glocks, he prefers the revolving wheel type.  His go-to guns are a Smith & Wesson 642 Performance Center for carry and a Ruger GP100 in the nightstand biometric safe (he has kids).  He loads both revolvers with old-school 148-grain Federal Gold Medal .38 wadcutters.  It’s OK if you think he’s a wimp. Email him . Share the Post and Images Related Posts The 4 Best IWB Holsters for Glock 27 -- Reviews 2020 The 4 "Best Ankle Holsters" on the Market – Reviews 2020 The 5 Best Glock 17 Holsters -- Reviews 2020

Best 1911 Compensators of 2020 Complete Guide

Compensators are one of the best attachments you could stick on your 1911. The pistol is known for its decent vertical kick and reducing that can only lead to a more comfortable shooting experience and better accuracy at range. What’s not to like? Let us help you find the perfect compensator for your 1911 with this handy guide. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for 1911 Compensators OUR TOP PICK: Parrish - Ez Equalizer 1911 Auto Bushing Comp Clark Custom - 1911 Drop-in Compensator Kit Wilson Combat - 1911 Multi-comp EGW - 1911 Hybrid Titanium Compensator Comparison Chart of the Best 1911 Compensators IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Parrish - Ez "Equalizer 1911 Auto" Bushing Comp Best Overall Bushing Type Easy Installation View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Clark Custom - 1911 Drop-in Compensator Kit Best For the Money Comes With Compensator and Barrel Bushing Compensator Pre-Fit for Barrel "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Wilson Combat - 1911 Multi-comp Bushing-Style Many Exhaust Ports Fits All Government-Style Barrels View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews EGW - 1911 "Hybrid Titanium Compensator" 7 Ports Threaded Traditional-Type View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Compensator and What is it Used For? A compensator is an attachment for the end of your 1911. It can be installed by you if you have the skills or if it’s a model that’s supposed to be easily installed, or by a professional gunsmith if you want the best possible job done on your firearm. Punisher Style 1911 Compensator Machine Finish ( Source ) When you fire a firearm, the gas explosion at the end causes your muzzle and barrel to kick upward. This can negatively affect your accuracy, especially if you intend to try to make quick follow-up shots. A compensator redirects this gas outward or down beneath the barrel, causing the recoil to be more evenly spread and your 1911 to kick upward less vigorously. This will have a positive effect on your accuracy . Note that this does not reduce recoil; it merely redirects it to a more constructive direction. You need to be careful not to have your hand near the 1911’s barrel, too, since the gas and energy is being moved away from the direct front of the gun. This means that your hand could get burned if it’s too close to the emission source. Are All Compensators The Same? Not all compensators are the same. They can differ by make, material, weight, and where their gas outlets are actually located. For instance, traditional compensators extend the overall length of your gun by attaching to the end of your barrel, while bushing compensators fit over your barrel and don’t extend its length. Some compensators have additional features, such as threaded barrels. These can continue the threading pattern you might find in your 1911 barrel, which can preserve the accuracy of a round as it continues to travel the extended length of the barrel and compensator. Others fit more or less tightly to your weapon, and this can also affect accuracy. Basically, like with every gun attachment, there are good and bad compensators and we’re here to help you find the good ones. Let’s go over what makes up a good compensator before we dig into our personal favorite picks. How to Choose a Compensator These are the most important factors when it comes to selecting the best compensator for your weapon. These will actually affect how it improves or decreases your 1911’s performance, so pay close attention and watch for these features as we go over our top picks. Weight​ Compensators with a hefty amount of weight will help decrease vertical recoil as you fire. Look for something that has a good weight to it, but one that’s also not so heavy as to negatively impact your accuracy. Threaded​ Some traditional compensators have threads to continue the spin of a round as it exits the barrel. This can further extend your accuracy and is a great passive benefit you should look for if you decide to settle on a traditional compensator. Traditional vs. Bushing Compensators ( Source ) Installation​ Some compensators are easy to install alone, while others require the skilled hand of a gunsmith. A gunsmith visit requires time and money, but you might find that the expertise results in a better fit than you might have managed alone. This is largely a personal preference, as there are good and bad compensators that make use of both installation methods. Traditional/Bushing​ Traditional compensators are favored among a lot of 1911 enthusiasts since they extend your barrel length and round range and can be threaded. The added weight and balance also make recoil easier to handle than ever. Bushing compensators tend to be cheaper and can add to a sleeker appearance for your weapon but will often be a little less effective at managing recoil than their traditional counterparts. Quick Take - The Best 1911 Compensators These are our recommendations for the best 1911 compensators: Parrish - Ez Equalizer 1911 Auto Bushing Comp Clark Custom - 1911 Drop-in Compensator Kit Wilson Combat - 1911 Multi-comp Review of the "Best 1911 Compensators" Now, let’s take a look at our favorite 1911 compensators. We’ll explain what makes each of them unique and worth your time and money. Best Overall: ​ Parrish EZ Equalizer 1911 Auto Bushing Compensator CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Fits All Calibers No Gunsmithing Required Made With a Corrosion-Resistant Coating Cons Odd Color What Recent Buyers Report The users of this compensator admire the reduction in muzzle rise and felt recoil. Along with the ease of installation of the device and only minor fitment(if needed). The compensator features impeccable finish and build quality. Another impressive trait of this comp was its aesthetics. Why it Stands Out to Us This compensator not only reduces muzzle rise significantly, but it also helps with reducing the recoil. It works with most 1911 models prevalent today and doesn’t require much fitting if needed. Another noticeable feature is its appropriate pricing. This compensator is among the best due to its amazing spread of perks . For one, it’s very easy to install; there’s no need to take an expensive trip to the gunsmith. All you have to do is screw it on tightly and secure it afterward. The compensator does a great job of reducing vertical recoil by pushing the gas away from the front of the barrel. It’s been treated to resist heat and corrosion, which both improves its anti-recoil effect and preserves its lifespan. The compensator is of a good weight and balance, and since it’s a bushing-style it won’t extend the length of your barrel at all, preserving your gun’s look. However, it does come in an odd color that may not jive with your desired feel. Although you can always paint over the piece before you install it, so this is a really minor flaw in our eyes. Who Will Use This Most This compensator is perfect for all applications associated with the 1911. But for the most part, the compensator is perfect for target practice and shooting competitions. Obviously due to the double benefit of countering recoil and muzzle rise. Additionally, this compensator is also a viable candidate for self-defense applications. Bottom Line The compensator offers reduction in recoil as well as muzzle rise. The fit and finish of this device are perfect and fair pricing makes it a good alternative to other more expensive compensators on the market. Another considerable factor is a low weight which doesn’t create balance and handling issues. This is an effective, affordable attachment that any good 1911 enthusiast will appreciate. Although it’s a bushing-type, it does an excellent job at reducing recoil and is super easy to install by yourself, no gunsmith needed. It’ll resist heat and corrosion, too, thanks to its special coating. Best for the Money: ​ Clark Custom 1911 Drop-In Compensator Kit CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros No Gunsmithing Required Excellent Value for the Price Improves Accuracy and Recoil Cons Expensive What "Recent Buyers Report" The barrel and compensator kit requires simple drop-in installation and features a match-grade finish which impresses users the most. The accuracy and recoil reduction of this kit are amazing and it fits snug inside the frame. The kit reduces both muzzle rise and recoil and has not been reported for any feeding or reliability issues. Why it Stands Out to Us This is a combo kit that has both a compensator and barrel. The bushing compensator is pre-fit for the barrel, so this is a great pick if you’re putting together your own custom 1911 and have yet to pick pieces for those two slots in your build. The compensator is great at reducing your overall recoil and the barrel is a match-grade variety, designed to improve speed and accuracy at long ranges. This is a combination of a match grade barrel and a compensator. Which prevents you from buying them separately and then going through the hassle of installation. The kit is extremely easy to install and promotes flawless feeding. The barrel fits perfectly and offers exceptional accuracy. This does mean that if you plan to use the compensator with a different barrel, a little gunsmithing might be necessary to make sure that everything will fit together naturally. However, since these come in a pair, we think using them together is the natural way to go. The two pieces are made with excellent quality materials and are easy to install. Once again, no gunsmith visit is necessary. For the money that you spend, you're getting some incredible value considering that these two pieces are about a third of an entire 1911. However, this kit will have less value if all you need is a compensator by itself. In that case, you should look elsewhere. Who Will "Use This Most" The match-grade quality of this kit truly implies that the kit is perfect for competitions. Additionally, the kit is great for practice and even self-defense. The pre-installed kit and barrel make it an easy choice for beginners or people who do not want to visit a gunsmith. Bottom Line The "Clark Custom 1911" barrel and compensator kit is a value for money upgrade to your 1911. The kit prevents you from the hassle of tedious installation and offers amazing accuracy, along with a reduction in muzzle rise and recoil. This is actually a barrel/compensator duo kit that provides both pieces for a great bargain. If you’re putting together your own custom 1911, you’ll definitely want to check this out. The compensator is pre-fit for the barrel and both pieces are designed to last. Install them on your own without having to visit a gunsmith. 3. Wilson Combat- 1911 Multi-Comp CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy Installation Controls Recoil Very Well for Bushing Piece Excellent to Pair With Government-Style Frame and Barrel Cons Needs to Be Fitted Carefully What Recent Buyers Report The users of this multi-comp compensator seem quite impressed with its aesthetics and the big difference in muzzle jump. While some users seemed concerned about the fitting, none of them had negative opinions about its performance. The comp is also quite tough and delivers great value for money. Why it Stands Out to Us This compensator is a hybrid device that tackles both muzzle rise and recoil. The comp is quite easy to install and has been priced perfectly to suit the average joe. The installation is as easy as fitting a new barrel bushing, and it fits all calibers of government length barrels. Here we have a great addition to any government-style 1911 . It’s been machined to fit the precise shape and size of most government-length barrels. If you already have a 1911 in this fashion, you’ll want to consider this piece for the aesthetic aspect alone. But even without the aesthetics, it’s a great piece. It has a lot of exhaust ports and chambers to release as much gas and recoil energy as possible, negating a lot of the poorer aspects of a bushing-type compensator. This will allow you to retain the slim appearance of a government 1911 while still having some exceptional recoil control. Installation is easy without a gunsmith, although you should be careful and use a rod to be sure that you have everything aligned as you put the piece on. Some minor fitting might be required after the fact, especially if you aren’t using a government barrel or frame. However, if you do fit these criteria we can think of no better compensator. Who Will Use This Most This muzzle can be used by everyone who wants to add a compensator to their 1911. It is good for practice, plinking, competitions, and self-defense. The compensator helps with firing quick follow up shots accurately, so you may consider it for EDC. Bottom Line The Wilson Combat multi-comp is by far the coolest looking compensator on our list. It fits almost every 1911 model with a full-length two-piece guide rod. It has been aptly priced to suit all budgets and is a very useful addition for the 1911 pistol. This is a bushing-type compensator that does a great job at reducing recoil and fitting the aesthetic vision of a government-type 1911. It’ll allow you to make or finish the gun you’ve always dreamed of having while still providing you with some great accuracy-boosting benefits. The installation is easy here, too. 4. EGW 1911 Hybrid Titanium Compensator CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Extends Range and Accuracy Many Ports for Reducing Recoil Excellent Titanium Construction Cons A Little Pricey What Recent Buyers Report The compensator is exceptionally durable and well made and delivers considerable reduction in muzzle rise along with recoil. The stainless steel appearance looks amazing, while the size of the comp stays in line with the barrel, thus eliminating any holstering or snagging issues. However, a contradiction was also reported by a user regarding the threading size. Why it Stands Out to Us This device has been made from high-grade titanium, which is by far the best metal to be used for a compensator. The seven ports have been properly aligned to maximize the porting effect while keeping the gun stable. Additionally, the compensator is very easy to install and aesthetically pleasing. This is a traditional-type compensator, so it’ll rest at the end of your barrel and extend the overall length of your weapon. As we discussed, this has several benefits, namely that it improves your accuracy at range and does a better job of reducing vertical recoil than most bushing-type compensators. This compensator also has a threaded interior, so the bullet you fire will continue to spin for a fraction of a second longer. This will improve your accuracy even further, resulting in gains that you’d previously only dreamed of. It feels wonderful to shoot a 1911 with a compensator like this one, which has a good weight and feel without being too bulky. This is due to its titanium construction, which is durable but balanced. The price is a little high, but this ensures quality and performance. It’s an ideal addition to any 1911 that you intend to push to the maximum reaches of its effectiveness, such as during a marksmanship tournament against other, more modern pistols. Whatever your need for a compensator, we’re sure that everyone will appreciate just how excellent this particular model is. Who Will Use This Most As the manufacturer describes, the compensator has been designed for Steel Challenge and Bianchi Cup shooting events. Which means it is ideal for shooting competitions. Additionally, it can also be used for target practice, hunting, and self-defense. Bottom Line The EGW 1911 hybrid compensator is the answer for pro shooters who need an apt device for high-end shooting competitions. The compensator is extremely durable and boasts a high-quality finish with appealing aesthetics. While being priced in a comparatively higher bracket, the quality and performance of this device are worth it. This excellent traditional-style compensator improves accuracy, range, and stability. It has a ton of ports for expressing gas and energy and is made from titanium. This causes it to be properly weighted without going overboard. Although it’s pricey, it’s well worth the cost, especially because of its threaded interior. 5. Tactical Precision - 1911 Titanium Muzzle Brake CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Tough and Long-Lasting Very Good Recoil Reduction Cons A Little Weighty Finally, take a look at this compensator/muzzle brake from Tactical Precision Manufacturing. It’s a traditional-style, so it’ll carry all the range and accuracy benefits we discussed previously. It’s not threaded like the last compensator we looked at, but it does still improve your accuracy passively, particularly when you’re firing a lot of shots in rapid succession. It’s made to be long-lasting as the durable titanium construction materials are designed to resist heat and trauma and should provide protection for the compensator for a long time to come. You also don’t need a gunsmith for this piece, as it’s easy enough to install with the right tools. Whereas most of the time some extra weight is just another good method of reducing vertical recoil, in this case, it's a little too much and we found that it's a bit too heavy to be useful. However, with all of the other factors considered, we still think this is an excellent compensator that can be yours for a pretty reasonable price. Bottom Line This is a compensator that’s a little heavy for our tastes, but it’s a durable, titanium-built piece that’ll provide wonderful recoil control for your vertical direction. Since it’s so tough, it might be a great pick for outdoor trips or long excursions when you aren’t sure when you’ll be able to perform repairs. Conclusion If you find the 1911 a little unwieldy, consider installing a great compensator like the ones listed above. You’ll find an immediate difference in both your accuracy and your speed. With any of these, you’ll be able to put down multiple shots so much more effectively than without a compensator. Thanks for reading! People Also Ask Now that we’ve reviewed the best 1911 compensators on the market. There are a few important questions that still need to be answered. Good knowledge of these minor topics will help you with your purchase and any other contingencies. What's the Difference Between a Compensator and a Muzzle Brake? A compensator is used for countering muzzle rise (muzzle flip) when the weapon is shot. It has vents on the top to direct gases upwards thus pushing the barrel down. A muzzle brake is used to counter recoil by porting gasses rearwards through its side vents. There also are hybrid devices on the market which combine these two and called hybrid brakes. Are Compensators Legal? Yes, they are legal in almost every state and case. But since gun laws differ from state to state, you must check with your local laws before buying one. For example, California states compensators to be legal unless the barrel of the pistol is not threaded. Can You Put a Compensator on a Threaded Barrel? Yes, in many cases you must have a threaded barrel in order to add a compensator. That's why barrels have threads in the first place - to add muzzle devices.  Although there are some devices that don’t need threads to be mounted, whereas some devices are permanently installed over the barrel.

Summary

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